Know When to Take a Mental Health Day

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A woman’s tweet about a sick day “to focus on my mental health,” and her boss’s response, spark discussion about depression on the job

Can a subjective decision on taking a mental health day off be quantified? Can you bring some level of objectivity into the decision? eMindLog does exactly that for stress, anxiety and depression.  

Mental health is not a monolithic concept. It can be broken into its components parts of emotions, thoughts and behaviors. When emotions like anxiety, anger, sadness and lack of pleasure are intense, they become the drivers of thoughts and actions. The process and content of thinking becomes captive to the emotion, and one largely loses the ability to modulate the emotion. Behaviors become compelling, automatic and conditioned to the emotion. These experiences are interlinked and can be given numbers that categorize them into mild, moderate or severe, guiding a decision on whether to take a mental health day. 

Taking a mental health day permits lowering ones emotional tone, giving thoughts greater control and behaviors capable of being chosen. It prevents actions at work that may have negative consequences as colleagues fix their perceptions of you and what they can expect. 

Register and try eMindLog – it’s free to users at eMindLog.com.

 

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Behavioral Health App eMindLog™ Wins New Product Innovation Award

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From Frost & Sullivan

SAN ANTONIO and GREENVILLE, N.C., May 16, 2017 — eMindLog™, a digital platform for self-measuring stress, anxiety and depression, has won Frost & Sullivan’s 2017 New Product Innovation Award for best practices in the behavioral health smartphone apps industry.

In selecting eMindLog™ for the award, Frost & Sullivan said, “Overall, eMindLog™ has the ability to lead in this market based not only on the scientific superiority of its app over competitors’, but also considering that it is the first to merge clinical psychology and neuroscience, granting it the first-mover advantage.”

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When Someone is ‘Too Functional’ to Have Mental Illness Taken Seriously

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Here’s the thing about having a mental illness – you can’t always see it or hear it if you’re on the outside. Unlike other illnesses like the flu or cancer where the symptoms show up visually or you can hear it in the voice of someone who has been up coughing all night, you can’t always see or hear that someone is experiencing depression or anxiety. And despite the misconception that people who are depressed don’t get out of bed or can’t find the energy to participate in their lives consistently, the majority of people experiencing depression are functioning members of society. So what do you do when you’re too “functional” to be taken seriously for experiencing depression or anxiety?

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Training your brain to think better

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Have you ever thought about thinking?

Thoughts are simply ideas that we are conscious of. Thinking is the flow of thoughts. Thinking can be automatic (passive, habitual, effortless) or deliberate (active, volitional, effortful). Thoughts can remain private in our mind or be shared with others as speech or writing. There is much we don’t understand about what goes on under the hood – how pre-conscious brain activity generates thinking.

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Mental Illness is on the Rise in the US

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CNN reports on a study just released, that states 3.4% of the adult, non-elderly population suffer from serious psychological distress – symptoms typically captured under the diagnosis of depression. This is greater than a 10% increase over the past decade in the U.S. Individuals with serious psychological distress are much more likely to suffer from poor physical health and tragically, less able to afford health care.

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6 subtle signs of depression you should never ignore

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Depression is now the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide, the World Health Organization said on Thursday, with more than 300 million people suffering from the condition.

Rates of depression have risen by more than 18 percent since 2005, but a lack of support for the mental health combined with a common fear of stigma means many do not get the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives.

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New Mobile Health Platform eMindLog™ Helps Consumers Track Stress, Anxiety, Depression for Mental Wellbeing

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GREENVILLE, N.C., March 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Just as people routinely monitor the vital signs of their bodies – blood pressure, temperature, cholesterol, sleep and exercise, etc. – for physical health, now they can track the vital signs of their minds for mental wellbeing.

A new mobile health platform, eMindLog™, allows people to take control of their mental wellbeing by self-measuring their stress, anxiety and depression using their smartphone, tablet or laptop computer. Consumers can also use it to determine how much their medication, therapy, meditation or yoga is helping.

With eMindLog, consumers can self-measure their stress, anxiety and depression for better mental wellbeing. They can opt to securely share their data with a doctor or therapist using the eMindLog Pro application, supporting better-informed diagnosis, treatment and followup care.

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Why Aren’t Primary Care Doctors Screening for Depression?

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Despite federal recommendations for depression screening, a new Rutgers study found that less than 5 percent of adults were screened for depression in primary care settings. The low screening rate suggests missed opportunities to identify individuals with depression and link them to care, according to study authors. The research was published in February in Psychiatric Services in Advance.

An estimated 13 to 16 percent of adults will experience symptoms of depression in their lifetime, and an estimated 4 to 8 percent experience major depression in a given year. Yet in primary care settings, depression goes unrecognized about half the time. Depression screening has been recommended since 2002 and it is generally covered by private insurance and Medicare.

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